EB-5 Offerings For Investors l Securities Lawyer 101 Blog

 Securities Lawyer 101 Blog

The EB-5 investor visa program is becoming more popular since Rule 506 (c) became law allowing issuers to advertise their offerings to foreign investors seeking U.S. residency. As with any investment proper due diligence is crucial. The Securities and Exchange Commission’s (“SEC”) Office of Investor Education and Advocacy and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) have issued recent warnings to foreign investors regarding the fraudulent use of the EB-5 program.

The EB-5 program provides certain foreign investors who can demonstrate that their investments are creating jobs in the United States, with a potential avenue to lawful permanent residency.

Business owners apply to USCIS to be designated as “regional centers” for the EB-5 program.  These regional centers offer investment opportunities in “new commercial enterprises” that may involve securities offerings.

How the EB-5 Program Works

Through EB-5, a foreign investor who invests a certain amount of money that is placed at risk, and creates or preserves a minimum number of jobs in the United States, is eligible to apply for conditional lawful permanent residency.  Toward the end of the two-year period of conditional residency, the foreign investor is eligible to apply to have the conditions on their lawful permanent residency removed, if he or she can establish that the job creation requirements have been met.  Foreign investors who invest through EB-5, however, are not guaranteed a visa or to become lawful permanent residents of the United States.

The fact that a business is designated as a regional center by USCIS does not mean that USCIS, the SEC, or any other government agency has approved the investments offered by the business, or has otherwise expressed a view on the quality of the investment.

Abuses of the EB-5 Program

The SEC and USCIS are aware of attempts to misuse the EB-5 program as a means to carry out fraudulent securities offerings.  In a recent case, SEC v. Marco A. Ramirez, et al., the SEC and USCIS worked together to stop an alleged investment scam in which the SEC claims that the defendants, including the USA Now regional center, falsely promised investors a 5% return on their investment and an opportunity to obtain an EB-5 visa.  The promoters allegedly started soliciting investors before USCIS had designated the business as a regional center.  The SEC alleged that while the defendants told investors their money would be held in escrow until USCIS approved the business as eligible for EB-5, the defendants misused investor funds for personal use such as funding their Cajun-themed restaurant.  According to the SEC’s complaint, the investors did not obtain even conditional visas as a result of their investments through the USA Now regional center.

In another case, SEC v. A Chicago Convention Center, et al., the SEC and USCIS coordinated to halt an alleged $156 million investment fraud.  The SEC alleged that an individual and his companies used false and misleading information to solicit investors in the “World’s First Zero Carbon Emission Platinum LEED certified” hotel and conference center in Chicago, including falsely claiming that the business had acquired all necessary building permits and that the project was backed by several major hotel chains.  According to the SEC’s complaint, the defendants promised investors that they would get back any administrative fees they paid for their investments if their EB-5 visa applications were denied.  The defendants allegedly spent more than 90 percent of the administrative fees, including some for personal use, before USCIS adjudicated the visa applications.

EB-5 Offerings And Due Diligence

As with any investment, it is important to research thoroughly any offering that purports to be affiliated with EB-5 and to review the terms of the offering with a qualified securites attorney.  Take these steps:

Confirm that the regional center has been designated by USCIS.  If you intend to invest through a regional center, check the list of current regional centers on USCIS’s website at www.uscis.gov.  If the regional center is not on the list, exercise extreme caution.  Even if it is on the list, understand that USCIS has not endorsed the regional center or any of the investments it offers.

Obtain copies of documents provided to USCIS.  Regional centers must file an initial application (Form I-924) to obtain USCIS approval and designation, and must submit an information collection supplement (Form I-924A) at the end of every calendar year.  Ask the regional center for copies of these forms and supporting documentation provided to USCIS.

Request investment information in writing.  Ask for a copy of the investment offering memorandum or private placement memorandum from the issuer.  Examine it carefully and research similar projects in evaluating the proposal.  Follow up with any questions you may have.  If you do not understand the information in the document or the issuer is unwilling or unable to answer your questions to your satisfaction, do not invest.

Ask if promoters are being paid.  If there are supposedly unaffiliated consultants, lawyers, or agencies recommending or endorsing the investment, ask how much money or what type of benefits they expect to receive in connection with recommending the investment.  Be skeptical of information from promoters that is inconsistent with the investment offering memorandum or private placement memorandum from the issuer.

Seek independent verification.  Confirm whether claims made about the investment are true.  For example, if the investment involves construction of commercial real estate, check county records to see if the issuer has obtained the proper permits and whether state and local property tax assessments correspond with the values the regional center attributes to the property.  If other companies have purportedly signed onto the project, go directly to those companies for confirmation.

Examine structural risk.  Understand that you may be investing in a new commercial enterprise that has no assets and has been established to loan funds to a company that will use the funds to develop projects.  Carefully examine loan documents and offering statements to determine if the loan is secured by any collateral pledged to investors.

Consider the developer’s incentives.  EB-5 regional center principals and developers often make capital investments in the projects they manage.  Recognize that if principals and developers do not make an equity investment in the project, their financial incentives may not be linked to the success of the project.

EB-5 Red Flags

Foreign citizens should look for the following warning signs of fraud:

♦ Promises of a visa or becoming a lawful permanent resident.  Investing through EB-5 makes you eligible to apply for a conditional visa, but there is no guarantee that USCIS will grant you a conditional visa or subsequently remove the conditions on your lawful permanent residency.  USCIS carefully reviews each case and denies cases where eligibility rules are not met.  Guarantees of the receipt or timing of a visa or green card are warning signs of fraud.

♦ Guaranteed investment returns or no investment risk.  Money invested through EB-5 must be at risk for the purpose of generating a return.  If you are guaranteed investment returns or told you will get back a portion of the money you invested, be suspicious.

♦ Overly consistent high investment returns.  Investments tend to go up and down over time, particularly those that offer high returns.  Be suspicious of an investment that claims to provide, or continues to generate, high rates of return regardless of overall market conditions.

♦ Unregistered investments.  Even though a regional center may be designated as a regional center by USCIS, most new commercial enterprise investment opportunities offered through regional centers are not registered with the SEC or any state regulator.  When an offering is unregistered, the issuer may not provide investors with access to key information about the company’s management, products, services, and finances that registration requires.  In such circumstances, investors should obtain additional information about the company to help ensure that the investment opportunity is bona fide.

♦ Unlicensed sellers.  Federal and state securities laws require investment professionals and their firms who offer and sell investments to be licensed or registered.  Designation as a regional center does not satisfy this requirement.  Many fraudulent investment schemes involve unlicensed individuals or unregistered firms.

♦ Layers of companies run by the same individuals. Some EB-5 regional center investments are structured through layers of different companies that are managed by the same individuals. In such circumstances, confirm that conflicts of interest have been fully disclosed and are minimized.

Carefully research any EB-5 offering before investing your money and seek the advice of securities and immigration counsel before investing in an EB-5 offering.   Hamilton & Associates has represented both investors and issuers in EB-5 matters.If your investment through EB-5 turns out to be in a fraudulent securities offering, you may lose both your money and your path to lawful permanent residency in the United States.

For further information about this securities law blog post, please contact Brenda Hamilton, Securities Attorney at 101 Plaza Real S, Suite 202 N, Boca Raton Florida, (561) 416-8956, by email at info@securitieslawyer101.com or visit www.securitieslawyer101.com.   This securities law blog post is provided as a general informational service to clients and friends of Hamilton & Associates Law Group and should not be construed as, and does not constitute, legal and compliance advice on any specific matter, nor does this message create an attorney-client relationship. For more information about going public and the rules and regulations affecting the use of Rule 144, Form 8K, crowdfunding,FINRA Rule 6490Rule 506private placement offerings and memorandums, Regulation A, Rule 504 offerings, SEC reporting requirements, SEC registration statements on Form S-1 IPO’s, OTC Pink Sheet listings, Form 10 OTCBB and OTC Markets disclosure requirements, DTC Chills, Global Locks, reverse mergers, public shells, direct public offerings and direct public offerings please contact Hamilton & Associates at (561) 416-8956 or info@securitieslawyer101.com. Please note that the prior results discussed herein do not guarantee similar outcomes.

Hamilton & Associates | Securities Lawyers
Brenda Hamilton, Securities Attorney
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 202 North
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
Telephone: (561) 416-8956
Facsimile: (561) 416-2855
www.SecuritiesLawyer101.com

 

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